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Web browser market share- latest research results

September 17, 2012 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Browser, Customer Service, Google, internet, Microsoft, Mozilla, Technology Companies, Uncategorized

The lastest web browser market share results have been announced for August 2012.Web browser market share- latest research resultsIt’s been a while since the Search Clinic last looked at the web browser share statistics- 2010 to be precise, when the Internet Explorer browser fell below 50 per cent market share.

Then the usage breakdown was Internet Explorer had a 49.87 per cent share of the global browser market, with Mozilla’s Firefox on 31.5 per cent market share, while Google’s Chrome browser accounted for only 11.54 per cent of the market.

The figures were researched by StatCounter.

The latest figures below have again been compiled by StatCounter and are based on analysis from 3 million websites.

The statistics for web browser market share in August 2012 show that now Chrome is top of the tree with a total web browser market share of 33.58%.

Internet Explorer now has a total share of 32.81%.

With the Firefox web browser now having a share of 22.86%.

Two other thoughts are that in 2010 the three browsers had a total share of 92.91- last month that dominance had only dropped to 89.25% and that despite Apple’s recent growth thier Safari browser is still a great distance away from disturbing that dominance.

YouTube withdraws terrorism videos

June 19, 2012 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Browser, Computers, Cyber Security, Google, internet, Social Media, Technology Companies, Uncategorized, Video Marketing, YouTube

YouTube’s ownsers Google has revealed that it removed about 640 videos that allegedly promoted terrorism over the second half of 2011 after complaints from the UK’s Association of Chief Police Officers.YouTube withdraws terrorism videosThe news was contained in its latest Transparency Report which discloses requests by international authorities to remove or hand over material.

The firm said it terminated five accounts linked to the suspect videos.

However, the firm said it had rejected many other state’s requests for action.

Canada’s Passport Office was among the organisations rebuffed. It had asked for a video of a Canadian citizen urinating on his passport and then flushing it down the toilet be removed.

Google also refused to delete six YouTube videos that satirised Pakistan’s army and senior politicians. The order had come from the government of Pakistan’s Ministry of Information Technology.

But Google did act in hundreds of cases, including:

  • requests to block more than 100 YouTube videos in Thailand that allegedly insulted its monarchy – a crime in the country;
  • the removal of a YouTube video that contained hate speech that had been posted in Turkey;
  • the termination of four YouTube accounts responsible for videos that allegedly contained threatening and harassing content after complaints by different US law enforcement agencies.

Overall, the firm said it had received 461 court orders covering a total of 6,989 items between July and December 2011. It said it had complied with 68% of the orders.

It added that it had received a further 546 informal requests covering 4,925 items, of which it had agreed to 43% of the cases.

Google’s senior policy analyst, Dorothy Chou, said the company was concerned by the amount of requests that had been linked to political speech.

“It’s alarming not only because free expression is at risk, but because some of these requests come from countries you might not suspect – Western democracies not typically associated with censorship,” she said.

“For example, in the second half of last year, Spanish regulators asked us to remove 270 search results that linked to blogs and articles in newspapers referencing individuals and public figures, including mayors and public prosecutors.

“In Poland, we received a request from the Agency for Enterprise Development to remove links to a site that criticised it.

“We didn’t comply with either of these requests.”

The real suprise is that Google have reacted at all.

A few years ago they tried to argue that as they were the recipients of so many videos they could not possibly police and delete videos. Now as they are becoming more corporate they are slowly realising that yes they too have to accept governmental requests.

UK snoopers’ charter faces severe criticism

June 15, 2012 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Browser, Cyber Security, data security, Email, Gaming, internet, search engines, Skype, Tablets, Technology Companies, Uncategorized

Civil liberty groups have voiced severe criticism over the newly published Data Communications bill aka snoopers’ charter. UK snoopers’ charter faces severe criticism   The controversial bill extends the type of data that Internet Service Providers must keep to include your emails, web browsing history and social media posts- including Skype.

The government claims that the legislation is need in the fight against criminals and terrorists.

However activists have dubbed it a snooper’s charter.

“This is all about giving the police unsupervised access to data. It is shocking for a government that opposed Labour’s plans on this to propose virtually the same thing,” said Jim Killock, director of the Open Rights Group.

“It will cost billions of pounds and will end up only catching the stupid or the innocent. Terrorists will circumvent it.”

Dyenamic Solutions also points out the non UK organisations may not be compelled to store your data- thus not only driving a coach and horses through the intended effectiveness, but also forcing many UK ecommerce business abroad.

Publishing the bill, Home Secretary Theresa May said: “Communications data saves lives. It is a vital tool for the police to catch criminals and to protect children.”

But Mr Killock argues that knowing where a citizen has been online is equally intrusive.

Drawing a parallel he said: “If I’m having an affair then who I’m talking to is just as revealing as what I say,” he said.

The bill – an update to the controversial RIPA (Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act) legislation – lays out new duties for the UK communications companies.

The new proposals would require ISPs to keep details of a much wider range of data including use of social network sites, webmail, voice calls over the internet, and gaming. Websites you visit will also be recorded.

The Internet Service Providers’ Association said that it would be lobbying MPs in the coming months.

“Ispa has concerns about the new powers to require network operators to capture and retain third party communications data,” said a spokesman.

“These concerns include the scope and proportionality, privacy and data protection implications and the technical feasibility.

“Whilst we appreciate that technological developments mean that government is looking again at its communications data capabilities, it is important that powers are clear and contain sufficient safeguards,” it added.

Please join the Snoopers Charter Petition– it takes just 2 minutes and could have a huge effect against this red tape- which the Financial Times estimates will cost us £2.8 billion over the next 10 years.

Microsoft launches Windows 8 beta with “Do not track”

June 01, 2012 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Browser, Ecommerce, internet, Microsoft, Technology Companies, Uncategorized

Microsoft has launched the most complete beta version of its new Windows 8 Operating System.Microsoft launches Windows 8 beta with "Do not track"The company said that tens of thousands of improvements have been made to what it calls the most important redesign of its interface since Windows 95.

Consumers can now download the release preview of Windows 8, a system which Microsoft says is its most tested operating system ever.

It is expected to go on sale in the autumn, three years after Windows 7.

The new operating system is designed to bring Windows into the touchscreen, smartphone era.

It adopts the Metro interface of the company’s mobile operating system, Windows Phone 7.

Windows, which still dominates the desktop PC software market, has been much slow to make an impact on the mobile phones and tablet computers markets.

Microsoft said manufacturers and developers were at work on new devices and apps designed to make the most of Windows 8’s features.

The latest version of Microsoft’s browser Internet Explorer 10, optimised for touchscreen, is also included for the first time. Users are promised greater personalisation of the start screen, and more control over privacy.

IE 10 will be the first version of the browser with “do not track” turned on by default, meaning users can easily decide not to accept cookies.

Microsoft’s Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch announced the move on his blog.

“In a world where consumers live a large part of their lives online, it is critical that we build trust that their personal information will be treated with respect, and that they will be given a choice to have their information used for unexpected purposes,” he wrote.

But the advertising industry has raised concerns.

Microsoft’s decision risked “limiting the availability and diversity of internet content and services for consumers,” said the Digital Advertising Alliance.

Dr Search approves of this new initiative as few people change their default security settings, so this attempt to limit the snooping of peoples’ browsers is good news.

Microsoft quarterly profits beat expectations

April 23, 2012 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Browser, Computers, Customer Service, Ecommerce, Microsoft, Mobile Marketing, smart phones, Uncategorized

Microsoft’s profits in the three months to the end of March dropped slightly but the results still beat analysts’ expectations after a surprise rise in sales of its Windows operating system.Microsoft quarterly profits beat expectationsThe world’s largest software firm made a net profit of £3.2 billion ($5.11 billion), compared with £3.3 billion a year earlier.

Sales rose by 6% to £10.875 billion.

Windows sales rose 4% against forecasts of a 4% decline, though sales at its entertainment division, which includes the Xbox console, fell 16%.

Its business division saw revenues increase 9% “reflecting the continued strength of Office 2010”, the company said.

Microsoft shares rose 3% in after-hours trading in New York.

The company also noted that the results for the same quarter a year ago had been boosted by a £288 million tax benefit.

Windows is facing competition from the growth of tablet computers such as Apple’s iPad and mobile devices using Google’s Android system.

However, Microsoft is hitting back with the release of Windows 8, an operating system for PCs and mobile devices.

Earlier this week Microsoft said this next operating system would come in three different types.

For those with Intel-compatible machines, the OS will be available in two versions – Windows 8 and Windows 8 Pro.

And for those with devices, largely tablets, powered by ARM-designed chips, there will be a Windows RT version.

Encyclopaedia Britannica ends its ubiquitous print edition

March 14, 2012 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Browser, Computers, Customer Service, Ecommerce, internet, Online Marketing, Technology Companies, Uncategorized

After 244 years the reference book firm Encyclopaedia Britannica has decided to stop publishing its famous and weighty 32 volume print edition.Encyclopaedia Britannica ends its ubiquitous print editionIt will now focus on digital expansion amid rising competition from websites such as Wikipedia.

The firm, which used to sell its encyclopaedias door-to-door, now generates almost 85% its revenue from online sales.

It recently launched a digital version of its encyclopaedias for tablet PCs.

“The sales of printed encyclopaedias have been negligible for several years,” said Jorge Cauz president of Encyclopaedia Britannica.

Companies across the globe have been trying to boost their online presence in a bid to cash in on the fast-growing market.

Various newspapers, magazines and even book publishers have been coming up with online versions of their products as an increasing number of readers access information on high-tech gadgets such as tablet PCs and smartphones.

Britannica said while its decision to focus on online editions was influenced by the shift in consumer pattern, the ability to update content at a short notice also played a big role.

“A printed encyclopaedia is obsolete the minute that you print it,” Mr Cauz said.  “Whereas our online edition is updated continuously.”

At the same time, frequent users of the encyclopaedia said they preferred using the online version more than the print one.

Encyclopaedia Britannica, the company, has largely moved away from its encyclopedia work focusing most of its energies in recent years on educational software.

CES review- Smart TVs are primed for growth

January 20, 2012 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Apps, Broadband, Browser, Customer Service, Ecommerce, internet, smart phones, Smart TV, Technology Companies, Televisions, Uncategorized

Smart TVs sets with the ability to stream online content, run apps and show television channels simultaneously dominated the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) exhibition.CES review- Smart TVs are primed for growthAt the end of 2011 there were 82 million connected TVs in homes worldwide according to research group Informa. By 2016 it forecasts that number will have ballooned to 892 million.

For years much of the tech industry has pursued a vision of the computer as the home’s digital hub. Owners used their PCs to copy photos off digital cameras, download music and movies and then transfer the material to other compatible devices.
Camera built into Samsung smart TV Samsung’s built-in camera allows its TV to recognise gestures and identify users

Advanced users might have connected their laptop to their TVs or streamed content to the sets wirelessly, but the televisions were at most at the end of a spur coming off the hub, rather than its heart.

The roll-out of cloud services allied to faster internet speeds now offers televisions the chance to usurp the PC’s place, and offers users further freedom from the confines of broadcasters’ schedules.

Samsung – the world’s best-selling TV-maker – has been at the forefront of efforts to deliver this vision.

One of the promotional videos it showed at this year’s event claimed watching television by appointment would become a foreign concept in the future, and its executives talk of the TV being the centre of the home.

Users are offered thousands of apps allowing them to use social networks, play video games, run educational software and follow exercise routines.

But smart TV makers recognise that people still want a sit back rather than lean forward experience most of the time.

Furthermore they acknowledge that increasing numbers of homes own other connected devices. So users may still find it preferable to tweet about a show via their tablet or smartphone rather than shrink the TV picture to pull up an app alongside.

However, manufacturers insist there are instances where it makes more sense to have everything on one screen.

While Samsung and Panasonic are developing their own system software, Google is taking a second crack at offering its own smart TV service.

At the show, LG and Vizio unveiled new sets with the search firm’s Android-based software built in. Sony also added the facility to two devices – a set-top box and a Blu-ray player.

The first version of Google TV launched in October 2010 to much fanfare, but proved a flop – enabled devices were criticised for being too expensive, and several TV networks blocked the US-only service from accessing their web content.

This time round a focus on apps may tempt content providers to co-operate, but for now it remains reliant on its own YouTube service as well as streams from Netflix, Amazon and several niche operations.

UK-based Canonical was punting a rival Linux-based Ubuntu operating system at the trade show. It says it offers a solution to clients who do not want to develop their own software and content deals, but feel uncomfortable linking up with Google.

Whichever operating system proves most popular, the internet poses a threat to the rest of the pay-TV market.

Furthermore, it says that recent developments have spurred pay-TV providers on to furnish its boxes with more material.

For now, the smart TV market looks fragmented from the point of view of content, and immature in terms of some of the technologies involved.

But as smart TVs become ever smarter, previous generations of unconnected sets may soon appear only slightly less antiquated than the black and white models of yesteryear.

Mozilla Firefox web browser to keep Google as default search engine

January 09, 2012 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Browser, Google, internet, Mozilla, Technology Companies, Twitter, Uncategorized

Mozilla has announced that it had “negotiated a significant and mutually beneficial revenue agreement” with Google for the next three years.Mozilla Firefox web browser to keep Google as default search engineSome people had wondered whether Google would back out of the deal as it tries to grow the market share of its own Chrome browser.

Mozilla relies heavily on the income generated by search partnerships.

“Under this multi-year agreement, Google Search will continue to be the default search provider for hundreds of millions of Firefox users around the world,” said Gary Kovacs, Mozilla’s chief executive.

Alan Eustace, Google’s senior vice-president of search, said: “Mozilla has been a valuable partner to Google over the years and we look forward to continuing this great partnership in the years to come.”

The foundation said the exact terms of the deal would not be disclosed.

In its accounts for 2010, the Mozilla Foundation said it earned £77 million ($121.1 million) from agreements with Google, Microsoft and others. The Google agreement was thought to make up about 85% of that amount.

The previous deal, which ran out in November, was signed before Google’s Chrome browser had gained a presence in the so-called “browser war”.

Some internet monitoring organisations suggest Chrome has overtaken Firefox to become the world’s second most widely used browser, behind Microsoft’s Internet Explorer.

Many put this down to lavish advertising campaigns undertaken by the search company across the world.

Chrome’s launch and subsequent growth has now put it in direct competition with Firefox, yet Google remains financially responsible for Mozilla’s survival.

Firefox 9, the Mozilla browser’s latest incarnation, was launched last month.

Mozilla said it was “30% faster” than previous versions – a problem that has been cited by many users switching to Chrome.

Software on Android phones tracks every key stroke

December 08, 2011 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Apps, Browser, Cyber Security, data security, Google, mobile phones, smart phones, Technology Companies, Uncategorized

Software installed on millions of Android phones is thought to be secretly tracking every key stroke, Google search, and text message by their users, it has been claimed.Software on Android phones tracks every key strokeAn Android app developer in America has posted a video showing what he claims is ‘conclusive proof’ that ‘Carrier IQ’ software installed by manufacturers of many US phones records the way those phones are used in real time, as well as their geographic locations.

Carrier IQ has claimed that the software only tracks information for the benefit of users, not for any spying purposes, and that it is “counting and summarising” information rather than recording it.

However, in a YouTube video the developer, Trevor Eckhart, did a “factory reset” on his Android phone, returning it to the condition in which it is shipped to customers, and linked it to a computer screen which allegedly displayed what the Carrier IQ software was tracking.

The demonstration shows that the software reads every keystroke put into the phone, as well as every text message sent to it. It also appeared to log location data, and transmit this to Carrier IQ.

Mr Eckhart, claims it is used by manufacturers of phones that use Google’s Android operating system, as well as some BlackBerry and Nokia handsets. It is not thought to be used in Apple’s iPhones.

It is not known if Carrier IQ is in use in Europe, where it might present a serious breach of the Data Protection laws.

A source at a leading mobile operator said his company didn’t install it but that he had been investigating whether UK manufacturers had done so and “couldn’t give a definitive answer”.

Chrome browser overtakes Firefox to become world’s second most popular

December 07, 2011 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Apple, Broadband, Browser, Customer Service, Ecommerce, Google, Microsoft, mobile phones, Mozilla, smart phones, Technology Companies, Uncategorized

Google’s Chrome has overtaken Mozilla’s Firefox as the world’s number two browser behind Microsoft’s Internet Explorer last month, according StatCounter. Chrome browser overtakes Firefox to become world's second most popularThe findings quote Chrome’s worldwide market share at 25.69% and Firefox’s at 25.23%. Internet Explorer, according to the same findings, dominates worldwide market share at 40.63%.

In the U.S., meanwhile, Chrome is still number three with 17.3%, a 6.41% jump compared to last November. Internet Explorer held the top spot with 50.66% and grew by 0.42%. Firefox was second with 20.09%.

Internet Explorer’s commanding lead has been challenged by the browser’s near absence from smartphones and tablets.

Last month, another researcher, Netmarketshare, reported that Internet Explorer’s share dipped below 50% for the first time.

Safari, Apple’s default browser on the iPhone and the iPad, claimed 62.17% of mobile traffic. Internet Explorer, meanwhile, had 52.63% of desktop traffic, according to the researcher.

Chrome may be coming to Google’s mobile Android platform soon, according to reports. The 3-year-old browser’s growth, which benefits from being promoted on Google.com, hit 200 million users in October.

Chrome also became the most popular browser for accessing Mashable in August.