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Archive for August, 2015

Android’s biggest update ever to fix security flaws

August 24, 2015 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Android, Cyber Security, data security, Google, Hackers, mobile phones, Samsung, Uncategorized

Last month a major bug was discovered in the Android software that could let hijackers access data on up to a billion phones.

Last month a major bug was discovered in the Android software that could let hijackers access data on up to a billion phones.

Samsung, LG and Google have pledged to provide monthly security updates for smartphones running the Android operating system.
Manufacturers have been slow to roll out a fix because many variations of Android are widely used.
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One Android expert said it was “about time” phone makers issued security fixes more quickly as Android is the most widely-used mobile operating system

Android has been working to patch a vulnerability, known as Stagefright, which could let hackers access a phone’s data simply by sending somebody a video message.

“My guess is that this is the single largest software update the world has ever seen,” said Adrian Ludwig, Android’s lead engineer for security, at hacking conference Black Hat.

LG, Samsung and Google have all said a number of their handsets will get the fix, with further updates every month.

Android is an open source operating system, with the software freely available for phone manufacturers to modify and use on their handsets.

The Google-led project does provide security fixes for the software, but phone manufacturers are responsible for sending the updates to their devices.

Some phones running old versions of Android are no longer updated by the manufacturer. Many companies also deploy customised versions of Android which take time to rebuild with the security changes.

Apple and BlackBerry can patch security problems more quickly because they develop both the software and the hardware for their devices.

BlackBerry’s software is reviewed by mobile networks before being sent to handsets, while Apple can push updates to its phones whenever it wants.
Some phone-makers add their own software to Android

“The very nature of Android is that manufacturers add their own software on top, so there have been delays in software roll-outs,” said Jack Parsons, editor of Android Magazine.

“In the US it’s even worse because mobile carriers often add their own software too, adding another layer of bureaucracy holding up security fixes.

First 3D printed pill approved by US authorities

August 14, 2015 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Blogs, Computers, Google, internet, Search Clinic, Tablets, Uncategorized

In a world first, the US Food and Drug Administration has given the go-ahead for a 3D-printed pill to be produced.

First 3D printed pill approved by US authorities

3D printed pills could pave way for bespoke medicines for individual patients. The FDA has previously approved medical devices – including prosthetics – that have been 3D printed.

The new drug, dubbed Spritam, was developed by Aprecia Pharmaceuticals to control seizures brought on by epilepsy. The company said that it planned to develop other medications using its 3D platform.

Printing the drugs allows layers of medication to be packaged more tightly in precise dosages.

A separate technology developed by the firm, known as ZipDose, makes high dose medications easier to swallow.

Printing the drug meant it could package up to 1,000 milligrams into individual tablets.

The 3D-printed pill dissolves in the same manner as other oral medicines.

Being able to 3D print a tablet offers the potential to create bespoke drugs based on the specific needs of patients, rather than having a one product fits all approach, according to experts.

“For the last 50 years we have manufactured tablets in factories and shipped them to hospitals and for the first time this process means we can produce tablets much closer to the patient,” said Dr Mohamed Albed Alhnan, a lecturer in pharmaceutics at the University of Central Lancashire.

It would mean that medical institutions could adjust the dose for individual patients with just a simple tweak to the software before printing. Previously, such personalised medicine would have been extremely expensive to produce, said Dr Alhnan.

3D printing works by creating an object layer by layer. In the case of medicines, printers are adapted to produce pharmaceutical compounds rather than polymers which are more usually used.

Such methods are already proving very useful in healthcare with doctors using the system to create customised implants for patients with injuries or other conditions.

And dentists, for example, use 3D printers to create replica jaws and teeth as well as other dental implants.

Spritam will launch in the first quarter of 2016, according to Aprecia.

Online trolls really are losers

August 04, 2015 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Apps, Dr Search, Gaming, Search Clinic, Technology Companies, Uncategorized

New research has found that men who harass women online are actual losers – at least when it comes to video games.

Online trolls really are losersTwo researchers analysed how men treated women while playing 163 games of Halo 3.

Men who performed poorly in the games responded by being hostile to female players- and were more likely to bully female players.

The male winners were mostly pleasant to other players, while the losing men made unsavoury comments to female players.

“Low-status males that have the most to lose due to a hierarchical reconfiguration are responding to the threat female competitors pose,” the researchers, from the University of New South Wales and the Miami University in Ohio, write. “High-status males with the least to fear were more positive.”

In Halo 3, players are anonymous and only interact with each other by voice a few times during the game. Most Halo players are men.

When performing poorly, players increased negative statements toward women and submissive statements toward the men who were winning.

“As men often rely on aggression to maintain their dominant social status, the increase in hostility towards a woman by lower-status males may be an attempt to disregard a female’s performance,” the researchers write.

Male players were thrown off by hearing female voices during the game. The researchers think their results suggest that young males should be taught that losing to women is not “socially debilitating”.

The results also suggest that video games may be reinforcing gender segregation and potentially promoting sexist behaviours, especially troubling since so many “gamers” are teenagers.