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Archive for October, 2014

Samsung loses market dominance as competition hots up

October 30, 2014 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Customer Service, Dr Search, Mobile Marketing, mobile phones, Samsung, Telecommunications Companies, Uncategorized

Samsung smartphones are struggling to “wow” consumers with new phones- leading to slowing sales.

Samsung loses market dominance as competition hots up

This week, the world’s largest smartphone maker said its third-quarter operating profit fell 60% from a year earlier to £2.5 billion, marking its weakest quarterly profit since 2011. Sales also tumbled 20% in the same period.

News of Samsung’s worsening condition come even as the tech giant maintains a stronghold on the global smartphone market – accounting for 25% of it in the second quarter of this year, according to technology research firm IDC. But, that’s down from 32% a year earlier.

With the mobile business making up 70% of its operating profit, Samsung has launched several products recently to try to stay ahead of its rivals, such as the latest version of its flagship smartphone Galaxy S5 in April, while being the first to launch the latest tech trend – the smartwatch – last year.

It also rushed the release of the newest editions of its larger screen Galaxy Notes – the Galaxy Note 4 and the Galaxy Note Edge – ahead of schedule in September to face off against demand for Apple’s larger screen iPhones.

But stiff competition from the likes of Apple in the premium end, and cheaper smartphones from Chinese rivals such as Xiaomi and Lenovo in the lower end, is making it more difficult for Samsung to see growth.

Analysts say Samsung will continue to lose market share unless it can figure out a way to once again “wow” consumers that no longer appear to be impressed by its massive line-up of products.

Fast-growing Chinese budget smartphone maker Xiaomi announced this year that it was planning to double the number of handsets sold in 2014 from a year ago to 60 million, which is the same amount that Samsung sold in China last year.

That has not helped Samsung’s case, especially when added to the delayed launch of Samsung’s long-awaited Tizen operating system, which would have reduced its reliance on Google’s Android system for its phones.

While analysts agree that it is too early to call the end of Samsung’s reign at the top of the market with still such a sizeable gap between it and its closest competitor Apple at 12% market share, they believe that Samsung’s current growth rate is not sustainable.

The double-digit growth last year that propelled Samsung’s mobile phone revenue to overtake its television revenue, will no longer happen in a saturated smartphone market.

But in order to stay on top of the market,  Samsung needs to figure out how to better integrate its devices and add services on top of its phones to add value for consumers.

Samsung needs to narrow its focus from being a mass producer of phones in every segment to concentrate on areas where there is consumer growth, such as the lower end of the market.

Samsung’s future plans to reignite sales growth do seem to be heading in the direction of the lower end of the market.

In its earnings release on Thursday, the tech giant said it expects demand to grow for its new “middle-end smartphone models” but that may “require a potential increase in marketing expenses associated with year-end promotion” to keep up with the competition.

But Samsung’s earnings may also take a hit in the long term from this move- once you move to the mid-range segment, you look at the profit margin, and you probably have to sell two or three phones to equal the flagship model revenue that you can get.

Met Office to build £97 million supercomputer

October 30, 2014 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Cloud Computing, Computers, Customer Service, Dr Search, Search Clinic, Technology Companies, Uncategorized

The Met Office have been given £97 million to build a supercomputer to improve their weather forecasting and climate modelling.

Met Office to build £97 million supercomputerThe facility will work 13 times faster than the current system- enabling detailed UK wide forecast models with a resolution of 1.5 km to be run every single hour, rather than every three.

It will be built in Exeter during 2015 and become operational next September.

The Met Office said it would deliver a “step change” in forecast accuracy. It will allow us to add more precision, more detail, more accuracy to our forecasts on all time scales for tomorrow, for the next day, next week, next month and even the next century,” said Met Office chief executive Rob Varley.

As well as running UK-wide and global forecasting models more frequently, the new technology will allow particularly important areas to receive much more detailed assessment.

For example, forecasts of wind speeds, fog and snow showers could be delivered for major airports, with a spatial resolution of 300m.

The extra capacity will also be useful for climate scientists, who need massive amounts of computing power to run detailed models over much longer time scales.

It will address one of the key challenges of climate projections – to “answer the real questions people need to know”, said Mr Varley. “We can tell you that the global average temperature is going to increase by 3C or 4C if we carry on as we are – but the critical question is what is that going to mean for London?

But because the weather matters so much – to everything from whether to leave home with a brolly to preparing for closed runways at an airport – all eyes are on the Met Office, and the glances are not often positive.

The biggest failures have now entered the national vocabulary: Michael Fish’s denial of an approaching hurricane in 1987 and the infamous suggestion of a “barbecue summer” in 2009 when the reality proved relentlessly soggy.

The Met Office asserts that people never notice everyday successes, a gradual increase in reliability that has seen each decade allow the forecasts to reach another day into the future.

The new supercomputer should accelerate that process, crunching bigger numbers at a finer scale and more frequently than ever before. But it may also raise expectations about accuracy. And, in a country obsessed with the weather, that brings its own risks.

Mr Varley said he was “absolutely delighted” the government had confirmed its investment, which was first promised by the chancellor in the 2013 Autumn Statement.

The new system will be housed partly at the Met Office headquarters in Exeter and partly at a new facility in the Exeter Science Park, and will reach its full capacity in 2017.

At that point, its processing power will be 16 petaflops – meaning it can perform 16 quadrillion calculations every second.

The “Cray XC40” machine will have 480,000 central processing units or CPUs, which is 12 times as many as the current Met Office supercomputer, made by IBM. At 140 tonnes, it will also be three times heavier.

It marks the biggest contract the Cray supercomputing firm has secured outside the US.

“It will be one of the best high-performance computers in the world,” Science Minister Greg Clark told journalists at the announcement, adding that it would “transform the analytical capacity of the Met Office”.

Mr Clark said the supercomputer would put the UK, appropriately, at the forefront of weather and climate science. “It makes us world leaders not only in talking about the weather, but forecasting it too.”

The improved forecasts, according to the Met Office, could deliver an estimated £2 billion in socio-economic benefits, including more advance warning of floods, less air travel disruption, more secure decision-making for renewable energy investments, and efficient planning for the impacts of climate change.

Queen Elizabeth sends first Tweet

October 24, 2014 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Computers, Dr Search, internet, Search Clinic, Technology Companies, Telecommunications Companies, Twitter, Uncategorized

The Queen has sent her first tweet to launch the Science Museum gallery.

Queen Elizabeth sends first Tweet“It is a pleasure to open the Information Age exhibition today at the @ScienceMuseum and I hope people will enjoy visiting. Elizabeth R.”

That was the Queen’s first tweet – sent through the @BritishMonarchy account – heralding the launch of a major new exhibition at London’s Science Museum.

Three years in the planning, the exhibition is one of the most ambitious projects the museum has undertaken.

The Information Age gallery, opened by the Queen this morning, takes visitors on a journey through the history of modern communications from the telegraph to the smartphone.

There is the first transatlantic telegraph cable which connected Europe and North America, the broadcast equipment behind the BBC’s first radio programme in 1922, and Sir Tim Berners-Lee’s NeXT computer, which hosted the first website.

The gallery’s chief curator Tilly Blyth hopes that visitors who may be somewhat blase about the digital revolution will come away with a longer view.

“We really want them to see that our predecessors lived through similar periods of change. Ours isn’t the only revolution – just the latest. in a series of transformations since the electric telegraph in the 1830s.”

You can construct a 1980s mobile phone network, making sure your cell towers are efficiently positioned. You can go into the web story box to find out exactly what happens when you click on a link. And you can plug headphones into a 1950s telephone exchange, and listen to the operators describing what their work involved.

Baroness Lane-Fox, who has campaigned for better access to and understanding of the internet, welcomes the new gallery: “It’s an amazing opportunity for people young and old to come and see the extraordinary developments in technology over the last hundred years or so. It really reminds me of the scale of ambition that people have had to change things.”

She hopes too that visitors will learn of the great contribution made by Britain to the development of communications – from Ada Lovelace, the woman who conceived the idea of computer programming in the 1830s, through to the 1950s when Lyons Corner Houses introduced the first business computer Leo, and on to Sir Tim Berners-Lee: “I hope that people who visit will have their ambition and excitement lit so we can continue to be world leaders in this field because it’s so important.”

The gallery certainly does show off the role Britain has played, and a number of British companies including BT and the chip designer ARM Holdings have sponsored the Information Age and supplied exhibits.