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Passwords- how to set and remember them

April 15, 2014 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Cyber Security, data security, Dr Search, Hackers, Personal Security, Search Clinic, Uncategorized

With the heightened risk of password hacking Search Clinic thought that it is a good time to refresh your memory on how to set- and remember your secure passwords.

Passwords- how to set and remember themDr Search of the Search Clinic visited the Cheltenham Science Festival a few years ago and attended a lecture by Toby of GCHQ on security in the computer age and posted a post at: top common passwords.

Your starter for ten is to make sure that you don’t use any of them. If you do- then you are already in trouble.

Changing passwords is something many people avoid at all costs- because they fear they will forget the new password.

However, you can make something memorable by simply using the power of association and location. In order to remember a string of online passwords, all you have to do is associate each individual letter and number with a known or fixed item, calling on your imagination throughout.

The more you stimulate and use your imagination, the more connections you will be able to make, and the more you will be able to memorise.

Memory expert Tony Buzan gives tips on how to remember new ones, which should be a long jumble of randomly generated letters and numbers.

No pet’s names- Hackers can find out a lot about you from social media

No dictionary words- Hackers can precalculate the encrypted forms of whole dictionaries and easily reverse engineer your password.

Mix unusual characters- Try a word or phrase where characters are substituted -Whyd03s1talw&ysr*in?

Have multiple passwords- If hackers compromise one system, they won’t be able to access other accounts.

Keep them safely- Don’t write them down – use a secure password vault on your phone. If you must worte them down label the file someother OTHER than passwords.

Tom from GCHQ suggested using a combination of the above, by using multiple words and numbers- with a few symbols thrown in for good measure:

wh1te-rabbt)*m0nth

Good Luck- and safe browsing.

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