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Online music piracy down

February 25, 2013 By: Dr Search Principal Consultant at the Search Clinic Category: Computers, data security, Dr Search, Hackers, internet, Search Clinic, Social Media, Technology Companies, Uncategorized

Online music piracy across the world “declined significantly” in 2012, according to a new report.Online music piracy down The NPD Group said last year the number of users on peer-to-peer (P2P) illegally downloading music fell by 17% – down to 21 million worldwide.

The market research firm cited an increased use of legal streaming music sites as being behind the drop.

The NPD Group’s report, based on its annual study of music consumers, said that at P2P file sharing’s peak, in 2005, as many as 33 million people used the services – one in five of all internet users aged 13 and older.

But in 2012 that number was measured as being down to 21 million people.

The report said as many as 40% of people who used illegal music services in 2011 stopped doing so in 2012.

Of those, 20% said this was due to the fact the illegal service they were using had been shut down, or had contained spyware and viruses.

More than half the users who stopped using illegal sites said they now preferred legal services such as the UK-headquartered Spotify.

The music industry has undertaken a sizable campaign over several years to see illegal sites and services put out of business.

In the UK, the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) took action to the courts, obtaining a court order to force internet service providers to block access to file-sharing site The Pirate Bay.

The Pirate Party UK – a political group that campaigns for an “open” internet – launched a proxy service to allow UK users to circumvent the block of The Pirate Bay, but that too was closed following legal threats from the BPI.

“In recent years, we’ve seen less P2P activity, because the music industry has successfully used litigation to shut down [P2P client] Limewire and other services,” said Russ Crupnick, senior vice president of NPD.

“Many of those who continued to use P2P services reported poor experiences, due to rampant spyware and viruses on illegal P2P sites.”

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